God's Cocksucker

adventuresofcesium:

i can’t stop thinking about how the only reason that the fire nation didn’t manage to conquer and destroy the world is because katara flipped a shit on her brother for making a sexist comment and stumbled upon aang in the iceberg

34 minutes agoqueerandpresentdangeradventuresofcesium 58,478 notes

fandomsandfeminism:

doctor-no-boyfriend:

Feminism had a noble cause for equality until it became a hate movement .

People have been accusing feminism of being a hate movement since women started trying to get the right to vote. 

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1 hour agogtfothinspodoctor-no-boyfriend 23,530 notes
2 hours agophilipgaydickgatissmark 77,725 notes

emilysidhe:

fredworldproblems:

I can’t sleep because I keep thinking about Bob Ross and Mister Rogers piloting a Jaeger.

Now you’re thinking about it.

The gentlest Jaeger.  It sits the kaijus down and talks to them about their feelings until the tantrum stops, and then they do art therapy.

3 hours agolinuxthegeekfredworldproblems 17,380 notes

therealhamster:

being interrupted mid sentence

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4 hours agokyleandmaxinesdaughtertherealhamster 154,668 notes#doggy #gpoy

brngrmln:

what if aliens invaded and were really uncomfortable with how many furries and monsterfuckers wanted to willingly be their sex slaves so they left, and then furries ended up saving the world, dude

5 hours agohoneyfluffbrngrmln 931 notes
Bullshit. The point of using someone’s preferred pronouns is to demonstrate that you respect their identity and want them to feel safe around you. If you think grammatical correctness is more important than making other people feel accepted and safe, then you are an asshole.
- From Anagnori's “A Non-Binary Person’s Guide to Invented Pronouns” (via svetamilkovich)
6 hours agotheberfofchristcassolotl 20,023 notes
hawtistic:

scattered-minutiae:

youneedacat:

[Picture and words taken from The Mouth Magazine Website.  This is old news, but it’s the best coverage I’ve found so far of the protest.  And it’s definitely old news, but worth passing around for lots of reasons.]
On May 19, a small group of people with Down Syndrome and their supporters disrupted the International Down Syndrome Screening Conference at Regents College in London. This is the first time that people with disabilities have spoken out publicly about prenatal screening. Their protest opens up the debate about genetics, eugenics, and the rights of disabled people.
As a result of the protest, the conference organizers allowed Anya Souza to speak from the podium, a platform her group had previously been denied. Ms. Souza, a trustee of the Down Syndrome Association who is labeled as “suffering” from the condition herself, told the doctors why she opposes the screenings.
Obstetricians, medical ethicists and genetic counselors have made testing for congenital disability a routine and even obligatory prenatal procedure throughout the “developed” world. Although the Roman Catholic Church and scattered right-to-life organizations have spoken out against abortion generally, no one has gone on record against aborting unborn children with disabilities simply because they have disabilities. Today only an estimated 10 percent of fetuses with disabling conditions, called “birth defects,” ever make it to the delivery room.
Objecting to prenatal screenings and abortions on disability rights rather than religious grounds, Souza and her fellow activists wrote to conference organizers in advance and asked to speak but were refused by the main organizer, Professor Howard Cuckle.
The protesters found it unacceptable that doctors would discuss better ways of preventing the birth of people with Down Syndrome while excluding the voices of people with that label from the debate. That runs, they said, directly counter to one of the main demands of the disability rights movement: Nothing about us without us.
In her speech, entitled “Everything you ever wanted to know about Down Syndrome… but never bothered to ask,” Souza said, “I can’t get rid of my Down Syndrome. But you can’t get rid of my happiness. You can’t get rid of the happiness I give others either.
"It’s doctors like you who want to test pregnant women and stop people like me being born. You can’t abort me now, can you? You can’t kill me. Sorry!
"Together with my family and friends I have fought to prevent my separation from normal society. I have fought for my rights….
"I have the right to a job, to services when necessary, to a decent standard of living, to know about my medical problems, to speak my mind, to make choices about my friends, whether to have sex, and so on.
"To do this, you have to be independent when you grow up and not get separated from society. … I may have Down Syndrome, but I am a person first."
Kathy Gilbert, another of the protest leaders, said later she enjoyed seeing the conference “although I was a bit scared of what the conference people were saying. I think screening pregnant mothers with Down Syndrome babies is wrong. They are wanting their offspring to be able to enjoy the world around them and have endless happiness. I, for one, gave my mum pride and joy and I will continue to do so. I think that we should be treated fairly and equally, not got rid of, because there is so much more in life that we can do.”
"We are what we are," Gilbert concluded. "Ask our opinion."
The protesters expect that their action, and Ms. Souza’s speechwhich received warm applause from the confereeswill persuade the organizers to ensure a full debate at next year’s conference, and proper representation of disabled people in that debate.
Genetic experts say:
"The normal-life/defective-life comparison in the context of ‘wrongful life’ actions is grounded in the presumption of a right to be born healthy."
Amost Shapira MJur, Professor of Law, Tel Aviv University, in Journal of Medical Ethics
"The small numbers of babies still being born with these conditions [spina bifida, hydrocephalus, cardiovascular problems, Down Syndrome and others] occurred because a few mothers failed to visit their medical practitioners or antenatal clinics, refused to undergo the tests, or declined to have terminations."
Richard Lynn in Eugenics: A Reassessment
"There is excellent evidence that there is a gene that causes autism on chromosome 7."
Steve Scherer, associate director of The Centre for Applied Genomics, Canada
"It’s uncontroversial that serious disabilities should be prevented in born persons…. Why not prevent the birth of persons with these conditions?"
biomedical ethicist Dan W. Brock of the National Institutes of Health, U.S.
"Parents will one day be able to choose for their children genes that increase athletic ability, genes that increase musical talents, and, ultimately, genes that affect cognitive abilities."
Lee Silver, molecular biologist at Princeton, quoted in The New York Times Magazine
"Here the state must see to it that only the healthy beget children… It must declare unfit for propagation all who are in any way visibly sick or who have inherited a disease …. Those who are physically and mentally unhealthy and unworthy must not perpetuate their suffering in the body of their children."
Germany’s Nuremberg Code

All those people who think “autism research” and “prevention” is such an awesome idea need to realize that much of it is genetic research and the goal is to identify us in utero—that’s how they want to prevent autism, the same way they’re “preventing” Down syndrome. I wonder how many terminations a woman would be willing to have to get a “normal” kid and “prevent” all the autistic ones she and her partner produced? Because autism is strongly genetically linked and a lot of families have multiple autistic children or even all autistic children. I don’t think people understand what prevention would look like or why prevention-targetes research is referred to as eugenics.

Hey autistics, it’s our responsibility to support people with other disabilities that are ALREADY UNDERGOING what we’re worried about. If you throw them under the bus in the name of advancing our agenda you may as well be just another curebie.

hawtistic:

scattered-minutiae:

youneedacat:

[Picture and words taken from The Mouth Magazine Website.  This is old news, but it’s the best coverage I’ve found so far of the protest.  And it’s definitely old news, but worth passing around for lots of reasons.]

On May 19, a small group of people with Down Syndrome and their supporters disrupted the International Down Syndrome Screening Conference at Regents College in London. This is the first time that people with disabilities have spoken out publicly about prenatal screening. Their protest opens up the debate about genetics, eugenics, and the rights of disabled people.

As a result of the protest, the conference organizers allowed Anya Souza to speak from the podium, a platform her group had previously been denied. Ms. Souza, a trustee of the Down Syndrome Association who is labeled as “suffering” from the condition herself, told the doctors why she opposes the screenings.

Obstetricians, medical ethicists and genetic counselors have made testing for congenital disability a routine and even obligatory prenatal procedure throughout the “developed” world. Although the Roman Catholic Church and scattered right-to-life organizations have spoken out against abortion generally, no one has gone on record against aborting unborn children with disabilities simply because they have disabilities. Today only an estimated 10 percent of fetuses with disabling conditions, called “birth defects,” ever make it to the delivery room.

Objecting to prenatal screenings and abortions on disability rights rather than religious grounds, Souza and her fellow activists wrote to conference organizers in advance and asked to speak but were refused by the main organizer, Professor Howard Cuckle.

The protesters found it unacceptable that doctors would discuss better ways of preventing the birth of people with Down Syndrome while excluding the voices of people with that label from the debate. That runs, they said, directly counter to one of the main demands of the disability rights movement: Nothing about us without us.

In her speech, entitled “Everything you ever wanted to know about Down Syndrome… but never bothered to ask,” Souza said, “I can’t get rid of my Down Syndrome. But you can’t get rid of my happiness. You can’t get rid of the happiness I give others either.

"It’s doctors like you who want to test pregnant women and stop people like me being born. You can’t abort me now, can you? You can’t kill me. Sorry!

"Together with my family and friends I have fought to prevent my separation from normal society. I have fought for my rights….

"I have the right to a job, to services when necessary, to a decent standard of living, to know about my medical problems, to speak my mind, to make choices about my friends, whether to have sex, and so on.

"To do this, you have to be independent when you grow up and not get separated from society. … I may have Down Syndrome, but I am a person first."

Kathy Gilbert, another of the protest leaders, said later she enjoyed seeing the conference “although I was a bit scared of what the conference people were saying. I think screening pregnant mothers with Down Syndrome babies is wrong. They are wanting their offspring to be able to enjoy the world around them and have endless happiness. I, for one, gave my mum pride and joy and I will continue to do so. I think that we should be treated fairly and equally, not got rid of, because there is so much more in life that we can do.”

"We are what we are," Gilbert concluded. "Ask our opinion."

The protesters expect that their action, and Ms. Souza’s speechwhich received warm applause from the confereeswill persuade the organizers to ensure a full debate at next year’s conference, and proper representation of disabled people in that debate.


Genetic experts say:

"The normal-life/defective-life comparison in the context of ‘wrongful life’ actions is grounded in the presumption of a right to be born healthy."

Amost Shapira MJur, Professor of Law, Tel Aviv University, in Journal of Medical Ethics

"The small numbers of babies still being born with these conditions [spina bifida, hydrocephalus, cardiovascular problems, Down Syndrome and others] occurred because a few mothers failed to visit their medical practitioners or antenatal clinics, refused to undergo the tests, or declined to have terminations."

Richard Lynn in Eugenics: A Reassessment

"There is excellent evidence that there is a gene that causes autism on chromosome 7."

Steve Scherer, associate director of The Centre for Applied Genomics, Canada

"It’s uncontroversial that serious disabilities should be prevented in born persons…. Why not prevent the birth of persons with these conditions?"

biomedical ethicist Dan W. Brock of the National Institutes of Health, U.S.

"Parents will one day be able to choose for their children genes that increase athletic ability, genes that increase musical talents, and, ultimately, genes that affect cognitive abilities."

Lee Silver, molecular biologist at Princeton, quoted in The New York Times Magazine

"Here the state must see to it that only the healthy beget children… It must declare unfit for propagation all who are in any way visibly sick or who have inherited a disease …. Those who are physically and mentally unhealthy and unworthy must not perpetuate their suffering in the body of their children."

Germany’s Nuremberg Code

All those people who think “autism research” and “prevention” is such an awesome idea need to realize that much of it is genetic research and the goal is to identify us in utero—that’s how they want to prevent autism, the same way they’re “preventing” Down syndrome. I wonder how many terminations a woman would be willing to have to get a “normal” kid and “prevent” all the autistic ones she and her partner produced? Because autism is strongly genetically linked and a lot of families have multiple autistic children or even all autistic children. I don’t think people understand what prevention would look like or why prevention-targetes research is referred to as eugenics.

Hey autistics, it’s our responsibility to support people with other disabilities that are ALREADY UNDERGOING what we’re worried about. If you throw them under the bus in the name of advancing our agenda you may as well be just another curebie.

7 hours agoglittermisandristyouneedacat 567 notes

chiripepe:

justgazing:

justgazing:

THIS WAS GOING TO BE LIKE SIX DIFFERENT VINE VIDEOS BUT VINE WOULDN’T LET ME SAVE THEM AND UPLOAD THEM LATER SO I ACTUALLY JUST MADE MY FIRST 30 SECOND NATURE DOCUMENTARY IN IMOVIE INSTEAD

FUCK THE VINE POLICE

Somebody just liked this old post so I think I’ll reblog. This video didn’t come out too badly

This is pretty and calming.

8 hours agoiwannabeyourgentlemanjustgazing 15 notes#video
↖ is now accepting curious anons.
8 hours agolinuxthegeek 250,969 notes

maisiewilliams:

you were named after the bravest man I ever knew, xkit guy potter-

8 hours agobeyonceprivilegemaisiewilliams 25,276 notes

blackfeminism:

besheroic:

manhatinglesbian:

besheroic:

blackfeminism:

besheroic:

An inspiration and Shero all her own.

This girl has nothing to be ashamed of, it is the rapists who need to be shamed and hide themselves.

Justice for Jada! 

This little girl is black, do you think this has anything to do with people’s obsession with memes of black girls

As a women of color ran organization with a Black female founder…[speaking], I [&we] for one DO!

The constant dehumanization of black girls and black people as a whole definitely contributes to the culture that allows for the rapes of black women and girls to be swept under the rug.

The person who attacked Jada, is on twitter using the handle @whiteboylaflare [update: account is deleted], WHO IS A WHITE BOY…makes this even more disturbing considering the history of sexual violence white males in this country [and the world over] have with black women.

Now there’s memes being passed around mocking her rape [further dehumanizing her and making the attack out to be a some elaborate joke].

I highly doubt that if she were white, the meme would be as disgustingly popular as it is.

This is a prime example of how violent things can get when misogyny and racism collide full force. 

We’re not having it, or any of the excuses

Anyone have any info on that white boy? He must be taken down.

His name is Innel Yahia

during the Stubenville videos, mocking the rape of a white girl, kids were kicked out of school.. i need this boy to do the same

8 hours agolittlebrownpixiebesheroic 811 notes#rape #rape culture #misogynoir
toastedtoffee:

How true, wisdom from a 5 year old

toastedtoffee:

How true, wisdom from a 5 year old

9 hours agoqueerandpresentdangertoastedtoffee 5,931 notes
womanistgrrrlcollective:

Will There Be Justice For Jada?
TW: Rape 
Source: Think Progress
In an incident that shares several elements with the infamous Steubenville rape case that made national headlines last year, a 16-year-old girl from Texas says that photos of her unconscious body went viral online after she was drugged and raped at a party with her fellow high schoolers. But the victim isn’t backing down. She’s speaking out about what happened to her, telling her story to local press and asking to be identified as Jada.
After other teens started mocking her online — sharing images of themselves splayed out on the floor in the same pose as Jada’s unconscious body under the hashtag #jadapose — the victim decided to speak out. She sat down with local outlet KHOU 11 to tell her side. “I’m just angry,” Jada said.
According to Jada, she was invited to a party at a fellow high schooler’s house. The boy who was hosting the party gave her a drink that she believes was spiked with a drug that made her lose consciousness. She passed out and doesn’t remember what happened next. But then she started seeing evidence of her sexual assault circulated online, and some of her peers started texting her to ask her if she was okay.
Then, #jadapose started turning her rape into a joke. When the Houston Press reached out to one of the individuals who shared a popular #jadapose photo, he said that he didn’t personally know Jada and was simply “bored at 1 a.m. and decided to wake up my (Twitter timeline).”
Jada decided to share her name and her story with the press because she has nothing to hide anymore. “Everybody has already seen my face and my body,” she said, “but that’s not what I am and who I am.” Nonetheless, the social media firestorm has taken a toll on her. She says she now wants to be homeschooled.
“No one’s daughter deserved this,” her mother, who asked not to be identified by name, told KHOU 11 News. “No human being deserved this.”
Like Jada, the Steubenville rape victim found out about her assault on social media, after images of her peers dragging her unconscious body were posted on Instagram and Twitter. A video of her attackers laughing and joking about her victimization — saying she was “deader than Trayvon Martin” — horrified people across the nation who wondered why these boys thought violating someone’s consent was so funny. After the internet hacktivist group Anonymous got involved in the case, and started demanding justice for the Steubenville victim, much of the country started paying attention to the criminal proceedings in the tiny Ohio town.
But, while Steubenville certainly helped spark a national conversationabout issues related to rape culture, it’s worth remembering that it’s hardly the only egregious example of sexual assault, victimization, and cyberbullying. The increased awareness to the subject at the time didn’t change the fact that the majority of teens still don’t learn anything abouthealthy relationships or sexual consent, and most young girls actually think of sexual violence as normal. Cases like Jada’s are happening all across thecountry, often exacerbated by kids who think it’s funny to post about it on social media.
The Houston police is currently investigating Jada’s allegations, and no arrests have yet been made. The alleged perpetrator has denied that a sexual assault occurred, referring to Jada as a “hoe” who “snitched.”

womanistgrrrlcollective:

Will There Be Justice For Jada?

TW: Rape 

Source: Think Progress

In an incident that shares several elements with the infamous Steubenville rape case that made national headlines last year, a 16-year-old girl from Texas says that photos of her unconscious body went viral online after she was drugged and raped at a party with her fellow high schoolers. But the victim isn’t backing down. She’s speaking out about what happened to her, telling her story to local press and asking to be identified as Jada.

After other teens started mocking her online — sharing images of themselves splayed out on the floor in the same pose as Jada’s unconscious body under the hashtag #jadapose — the victim decided to speak out. She sat down with local outlet KHOU 11 to tell her side. “I’m just angry,” Jada said.

According to Jada, she was invited to a party at a fellow high schooler’s house. The boy who was hosting the party gave her a drink that she believes was spiked with a drug that made her lose consciousness. She passed out and doesn’t remember what happened next. But then she started seeing evidence of her sexual assault circulated online, and some of her peers started texting her to ask her if she was okay.

Then, #jadapose started turning her rape into a joke. When the Houston Press reached out to one of the individuals who shared a popular #jadapose photo, he said that he didn’t personally know Jada and was simply “bored at 1 a.m. and decided to wake up my (Twitter timeline).”

Jada decided to share her name and her story with the press because she has nothing to hide anymore. “Everybody has already seen my face and my body,” she said, “but that’s not what I am and who I am.” Nonetheless, the social media firestorm has taken a toll on her. She says she now wants to be homeschooled.

“No one’s daughter deserved this,” her mother, who asked not to be identified by name, told KHOU 11 News. “No human being deserved this.”

Like Jada, the Steubenville rape victim found out about her assault on social media, after images of her peers dragging her unconscious body were posted on Instagram and Twitter. A video of her attackers laughing and joking about her victimization — saying she was “deader than Trayvon Martin” — horrified people across the nation who wondered why these boys thought violating someone’s consent was so funny. After the internet hacktivist group Anonymous got involved in the case, and started demanding justice for the Steubenville victim, much of the country started paying attention to the criminal proceedings in the tiny Ohio town.

But, while Steubenville certainly helped spark a national conversationabout issues related to rape culture, it’s worth remembering that it’s hardly the only egregious example of sexual assault, victimization, and cyberbullying. The increased awareness to the subject at the time didn’t change the fact that the majority of teens still don’t learn anything abouthealthy relationships or sexual consent, and most young girls actually think of sexual violence as normal. Cases like Jada’s are happening all across thecountry, often exacerbated by kids who think it’s funny to post about it on social media.

The Houston police is currently investigating Jada’s allegations, and no arrests have yet been made. The alleged perpetrator has denied that a sexual assault occurred, referring to Jada as a “hoe” who “snitched.”

9 hours agohannalawomanistgrrrlcollective 6,878 notes#rape tw #rape culture
The struggles of working-class African-American girls like Maia—almost 60 percent of whom are victims of sexual assault according to an ongoing study by Black Women’s Blueprint—are too often ignored: by the local police officers who initially doubted her story; by her state lawmakers who have yet to make the recommendations of the Ensuring Student Success Act, to help survivors of domestic and sexual violence stay in school, mandatory in Illinois.

And now by the White House’s new My Brother’s Keeper initiative, a $200 million public and private partnership to help young people of color reach their full potential in the United States, and which focuses exclusively on boys and young men. In Chicago, the violence that affects all young people of color—guns, gangs and school suspensions—is frequently framed as one that only impacts boys of color. That those same—and additional—forms of violence affect girls of color rarely makes headlines or pushes funding.
- Salamishah Tillet, "Why Girls of Color Should Be Included in My Brother’s Keeper" (via ethiopienne)
9 hours agolittlebrownpixieethiopienne 216 notes
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